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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Mar 15, 2011 1:00am PDT
nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
PBS
Mar 9, 2011 7:00pm PST
holding in u.s. treasuries. >> tom: we ask pimco's bill gross why he's bailing out of government debt and where he's putting money now. you're watching "nightly business" report for wednesday, march 9. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds, corporate debt, foreign bonds and municipal securities. >> susie: so what's the reason behind the bond fire sale? joining us now: william gross, the founder and co-chief investment officer of pimco. hi,
PBS
Mar 17, 2011 7:00pm EDT
. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the unite states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besid
PBS
Mar 28, 2011 7:00pm EDT
>> tom: more than a week after air strikes began, what's the taxpayers' bill so far for u.s. military operations in libya? >> we've spent between $300 and $500 million, but as we move forward those costs should drop substantially. >> suzanne: as president obama talks to americans about libya, we'll look at how much money the conflict will cost the u.s., even as nato takes the lead. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 28. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. u.s. warplanes, ships and missiles have been striking against libya for more than a week. this evening, suzanne, president obama makes his case to the american people. that's after facing questions about the goals and costs of the mission. >> suzanne: and, tom, the president's speech come
PBS
Mar 12, 2011 1:00am PST
markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minutes after the earthquake hit. >> tom: we spoke with our correspondent in tokyo. and began by asking lucy craft what's the initial assessment of damage to businesses and industry in japan. >> companies hit quite hard. sony, hond on, toyota, the major auto makers have a lot of factories up in northeastern japan. there's been a range of damage to these companies. so those factories will be kind of knocked out of operation for various amounts of time. fortunately, the northeastern area of japan is very sparsely populated. this is -- if you compare this to the kobe earthquake of 16 years ago, it accounts for a much smaller amount of gdp. >> reporter: what have you learned about the damage to the trainl systems and infrastructure? >> we haven't heard about the damage to the train system which is a major source of transportation here. when you talk about energy, though, it's a whole different ball of wax, and there's a lot of different questions hanging over one or two of japan's nuclear power p
PBS
Mar 15, 2011 7:00pm PDT
confidence, and stock markets around the world sold off. here in the u.s., the panic- selling swept through wall street, but the major averages rebounded by the close of trading. the dow tumbled 137 points, reversing a loss of nearly 300 points earlier in the session. the nasdaq fell 33, and the s&p was down 15. so what happens now? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the moment the opening bell rang on wall street, fear gripped the stock market. trader art cashin says the disaster in japan prompted many investors to dump their holdings at any price. >> when you can't sell what you want to sell, you sell whatever you can-- sometimes, your grandmother's necklace. you don't like to sell that, but if that's the only thing that gets you money, you have to do that. >> reporter: the dow's decline was serious, but the drop was far worse in japan. the nikkei lost more than 10%. most european markets also fell. the question for investors is what to do now? is the stock market overreacting to the crisis in japan, or does it pose a major threat to global growth? market strategist alec young say
PBS
Mar 1, 2011 7:00pm PST
temporary and relatively modest increase in u.s. consumer price inflation. >> susie: the latest on inflation and what it'll take to end the fed's government bond buying binge. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 1. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. ben bernanke said today the federal reserve is ready to take action if high oil prices threaten the economy. susie, the fed chief's comments came on a day when oil prices gushed higher. >> susie: tom, as bernanke was testifying on capitol hill in washington, oil futures trading here in new york surged to just below the $100 level. april crude rose $2.66 a barrel, or more than 2.5%. and those rising oil prices triggered a stock sell-off on wall street-- the dow fell 168 points, the nasdaq lost 44, and the s&p 500 off almost 22. >> tom: against that market back
PBS
Mar 21, 2011 6:30pm PDT
joining us. at&t wants to buy t-mobile in a $39 billion deal that could reshape the u.s. wireless industry. susie, if approved, it would leave just three major carriers in this country: at&t, verizon and the much smaller sprint nextel. >> susie: it is a dramatic change, tom. the proposed merger has been approved by the boards of both at&t and t-mobile parent deutche telekom. the deal still faces scrutiny from the department of justice and the federal communications commission. >> tom: critics say the merger could lead to higher prices. and as darren gersh reports, it may also change the way wireless companies do business. >> reporter: to really understand what's driving the future of telecom, you need to appreciate the difference between smartphones and what analysts like dan hayes call dumb pipes. >> the fear among the network service providers is that they are being relegated to being dumb pipes, where all they are doing is providing connectivity for voice calls and connectivity to the internet and all the value is being taken by companies like google or applications providers w
PBS
Mar 16, 2011 6:30pm PDT
around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of the area were urged to evacuate. >> susie: and tom, those warnings spooked u.s. stock investors
PBS
Mar 24, 2011 6:30pm PDT
jose socrates to resign. >> susie: here in the u.s., the financial markets ignored those debt concerns. but erika miller looks at why american investors may want to pay attention to the crisis in portugal. >> reporter: for the past few weeks, investors have had plenty of distractions, ranging from political upheaval in egypt and libya to natural disasters and nuclear problems in japan to sharply higher oil prices. but today, the spotlight was on a problem many thought had gone away-- the european debt crisis. the fall of the portuguese government has pushed that country's borrowing rates to record levels, making it more difficult for portugal to get a handle on it's debt. economist brian levitt says the fear in financial markets is that portugal could need an expensive bailout. >> the big fear about the fall of the government in portugal is that they are not going to go through the austerity measures that they need, that the larger euro-economies want for them to go through in order to get additional credit facilities. >> reporter: another fear is contagion, reinforced by cred
PBS
Mar 10, 2011 7:00pm PST
the jitters-- worries about china's economic growth, and some disappointing news about the u.s. job market. the selling was broad-based-- the dow fell 228 points, closing below the 12,000 level; the nasdaq lost 50, and the s&p 500 was down almost 25 points. >> tom: this stock selling comes as the bull market celebrated its second anniversary this week. could the rally be over, or just taking a pause? peter cohen is co-author of "capital rising," and he is with us from newton, massachusetts. lincoln ellis is the chief investment officer at the strategic financial group. he joins us from the cme group in chicago. welcome to nightly business report. nice to see both of you. >> thank you. >> thanks, tom. >> tom: peter, let's begin with you. time to buy more shares on these lower prices or to cut some of the losses you've seen recently and sell? >> i say it's time to buy. i mean it could go lower. i mean you could have a 5% correction can. but in general, the market is doing fan tasically. it's been up almost 100% since the low of march 2009. it's trading act a relatively low pe of aroun
PBS
Mar 19, 2011 1:00am PDT
u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and will begin talking with opposition groups. that came after a vote at the united nations calling for a no- fly zone over the country. not surprisingly, oil markets were volatile today. crude prices closed down 35 cents to settle at $101 a barrel, off their high of $103. as suzanne pratt reports the oil market is coping with a long list of issues. >> reporter: in the past week much of the world has been fixated on japan, with one exception. the global oil market is paying much more attention to bubbling conflict in north africa and the middle east. oil trader john woods says right now all eyes are li
PBS
Mar 3, 2011 7:00pm EST
mexican trucks into the u.s. here's the deal-- if the trucks come in, mexico will drop $2 billion in tariffs on u.s. goods. our congress still has to sign off on it. if you carry on luggage when flying, you're costing uncle sam big bucks. t.s.a. screening of carry-on bags costs the federal government $260 million a year. the agency wants a hike in ticket security fees to cover those costs. still ahead-- generation "y" is falling behind when it comes to investing. a look at the trend for those between 18 and 30 years old, and what it could mean for their future. >> susie: the contract dispute between nfl owners and the union representing the players. late today both sides agreed to extend contract talks through tomorrow. the original deadline was midnight tonight. now the n the nfl's lead attorney and nfl players met late this afternoon in washington, d.c., for more negotiations. the labor showdown could determine whether or not the american public will be able to watch their favorite sport. joining us now to talk about what's at stake, william gould, professor of law at stanford univ
PBS
Mar 29, 2011 7:00pm PDT
home loans are growing in popularity, again, and whether you should consider one. >> suzanne: the u.s. supreme court heard arguments today in a mammoth gender discrimination case against walmart. the justices seemed sympathetic to the giant retailer in considering whether a small group of women can represent a huge nationwide class. walmart is accused of discriminating against female employees by denying promotions and paying them less than men. today, the court questioned whether the alleged treatment was part of a corporate policy. >> tom: the third largest u.s. stock exchange, called bats global markets, wants to compete with its bigger rivals. bats plans to launch a new listings service for u.s. stocks by the end of this year. the move opens the door for u.s. companies to take their shares public somewhere other than the new york stock exchange or nasdaq. bats is based in kansas city and already competes with those better-known exchanges in its trading business. >> suzanne: when it comes to banks and the lessons learned from the financial crisis, tonight's commentator says what's
PBS
Mar 4, 2011 7:00pm EST
the first time in almost two years. >> tom: can the hiring continue? the outlook for the u.s. job market from two top economists. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 4. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. finally we got some good news today about the job market: strong business hiring in february. but tom, that was overshadowed by a big jump in oil prices. >> tom: susie, oil prices surged again today as anti-government protests continued in libya, bahrain and yemen. april crude futures now stand at $104 a barrel up $2.50 to more than a two-year high. but on the bright side, american businesses added 192,000 jobs in february-- the fastest pace of hiring since last may. the unemployment rate dropped to 8.9%-- the third straight monthly decline. >> susie: from wall street to main street, everyone's trying to figure out if
PBS
Mar 23, 2011 7:00pm EDT
for joining us. new signs today the u.s. housing market still is struggling. susie, that's even as many parts of the economy are recovering. >> susie: tom, what got everyone concerned is the latest new home sales numbers. they fell to a record low. sales tumbled almost 17% in february. even lower prices couldn't bring in the buyers. the average selling price for a new home fell to $202,000. at the current sales pace, it would take almost nine months to sell all the new homes on the market. >> tom: this discouraging news comes right at the start of the spring selling season. erika miller reports. >> reporter: instead of eating during her lunch hour, angie moncada likes to go house hunting online. she and her husband have been waiting for spring to get serious about their search. >> we want to move somewhere around the beginning of june. also it seems like things are just picking up generally, and we're hoping that people who have been holding out on putting their homes on the market will be doing so now. >> reporter: it also doesn't hurt that home prices nationwide are still falling
WETA
Mar 25, 2011 6:30pm EDT
>> susie: the u.s. economy has been picking up speed, but experts wonder if that momentum can continue? >> rising energy prices are clearly a risk to the outlook and they are providing a headwind to the economy right now. >> tom: from higher prices to fill-up at the pump to higher prices at the grocery store. will consumers keep spending? you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 25. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. the u.s. economy has been growing at a faster pace than previous estimates, but consumers are becoming more gloomy. >> susie: tom, it's a mixed bag of information. let's look at the numbers. the commerce department reported today that the gross domestic product or g.d.p. grew 3.1% in the last three months of 2010, up from an earlier estimate of 2.8%. but more rec
PBS
Feb 28, 2011 7:00pm PST
crisis as well as persistently high u.s. unemployment. >> we will continue to get headlines that are negative headlines. it just seems that the market is so resilient at this point that it digests the headlines and it really takes just a day or two to shake it off. >> reporter: and, experts say it's a lot easier to shake off those headlines if the u.s. economy is on strong footing. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report," new york. >> tom: for many businesses, it's gasoline prices that are worrying. and those prices are expected to continue climbing following the sharp rise in the price of crude oil. the national average price for a gallon of regular gasoline is now $3.35. that's up nearly 20 cents from a week ago, and 65 cents higher than a year ago. economists say higher fuel costs could force some consumers to pull back discretionary spending. as diane eastabrook reports, many small businesses are afraid to raise prices, despite gasoline costs eating into profits. >> reporter: the prices phillip's flowers and gifts has been paying for roses and other blossoms have been stable
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)